Home  >  News  >  VENDÉE GLOBE - WEEK [...] CAPE HORN

Receive our newsletter

Signin now

 

We do not pass your email to ANY third parties.

Facebook Twitter RSS

Official Partner

  • Mutuelle Des Sportifs
  • Azimut Communication

Official Suppliers

  • Sea & Co
  • FFVISAF
  • TOLRIP
  • SailingNews.tv

Supporters

News

VENDÉE GLOBE - WEEK 10: AGE NO BARRIER AS ROURA AND WILSON ROUND CAPE HORN

unnamed.jpg

The Vendée Globe's youngest and oldest skippers have rounded Cape Horn andpassed into the Atlantic. Swiss sailor Alan Roura, at 23 years old the 'baby' of the Vendée Globe fleet, passed the iconic landmark for the first time at 1639 UTC yesterday in 13th place. Less than 12 hours later the race's elder statesman, 66­year­old American skipper Rich Wilson, followed suit, rounding Cape Horn at 0257 UTC today.

 

The two sailors, split in age by 43 years, have become close after spending much of the race battling  against  one  another  and  sharing  their  experiences  over  email  and  VHF.  Roura described his first ever rounding of Cape Horn, one of the greatest achievements for a sailor, as “magnificent” as he passed in Force 7 breeze and big waves. “I was closeto it coming within two  miles  in  33  knots  of  wind  in  heavy  seas,”  Roura  said.  “It  was magnificent,  just  as  I imagined. Albatrosseseverywhere, the sea looking black and white, beautiful skies, even if the sun was not out in several shades of grey, with very dark clouds and lots of squalls. I am at the end of the world, the mostsoutherly headland and it’s absolutely incredible. This moment is forever etched on my mind. It is the Holy Grail for sailors and now I’m here. I have succeeded in my Vendée Globe challenge. I have been through the Southern Ocean. I am thinking about all those, who had to stopbefore getting this far. I’m proud of myself and what I have done. I’m so lucky to be here. It’s simply fantastic!”

 

This morning Roura's yacht La Fabrique was around 110 nautical miles north­east of Wilson's Great American IV. Roura has chosen to take an unconventional route through the Le Maire View the online version

 

Age no barrier as Roura and Wilson round Cape Horn

 

Strait, a narrow stretch of water between mainland Tierra del Fuego and Staten Island. Wilson, meanwhile,  opted  to  steer  clear  of  the  biggest  seas  closest  to  land,  passing  Cape  Horn  by some 30nm to the south. “As  the group  of  four  approached  from  the west  in  strong winds  it looked  as  though  the  first  couple  of  boats  would  be  able  to  get  across  the  continental  shelf before  the  strong  winds  came  down  from  Chile,”  Wilson  explained.  “The  water  goes  from 12,000ft to 600ft in a matter of 10 miles or so. If the waves are coming in from the west they can bounce off the coast and ricochet back out to sea with some level of intensity. I just didn't think getting close to that was a wise move.”

 

Meanwhile  at  the  head  of  the  fleet  Armel  Le  Cléac'h  has  maintained  his  75nm  lead  over second­

 

placed Alex Thomson overnight with just 600nm left to go. Thomson yesterday reported problems with his steering, due to a certain level of play in the rudders, that he said he would be able to fix once the winds lightened off asthe pair head into high pressure. Le Cléac'h was slightly  quicker  this  morning,  at  the  0400  UTC  report  making  16.9  knots  compared  to Thomson's 16.1. Both skippers are expected to arrive at the finish line in Les Sables d'Olonne, France, on Thursday.

 

Highlights from week 10 of the Vendée Globe:

 

 


Display the whole heading


Legal information | Site map      ©2012-2017 Azimut Communication - Website design & Interactive kiosks  - design based on v1 by OC Sport